Monday, May 2, 2016

WOI Guest Post: The Successful Writer





I don't believe in luck. I don't subscribe to the idea that successful people get to where they are because they happened to be "at the right place at the right time." They're successful because they stick their necks out and give more than what others wanting the same thing they do are willing to give. They find ways to achieve what they want, accomplish what they want to accomplish. When there aren't opportunities, they create the opportunities. When they fail for the thousandth time, they can't wait to try again.

Now apply all the above to writers. Talent is nothing if you don't have the guts to do what you need to do to accomplish your goals. If your goal is to be published, then you have to do what it takes to get published, and that involves a lot of hard work -- from honing your craft, reading, studying the markets, submitting your work, accepting the rejections and submitting again.

In my view, a persistent writer is better than a talented writer who does nothing. The persistent writer is the one who gets published. She's the one who eventually becomes "big" or well known in her chosen writing genre.

Successful writers like Stephen King, JK Rowling and Erich Segal didn't get to where they are through luck. I'm willing to bet they spent thousands of hours honing their craft. They aren't untouchables; they didn't breeze through the top with nary a rejection hiding somewhere in their drawers. They did the things aspiring and beginning writers should do if they want to realize their goals -- the successful writers picked up their pens, wrote, submitted their works, treated rejections as a part of the writing life, wrote again, submitted again, got rejections again, wrote some more, submitted some more, and so on.

Instead of idolizing successful writers, an aspiring or beginning writer is better off emulating them. I think it's dangerous for an aspiring writer to idolize a successful writer. Why? She's putting the successful writer on a god-like status, unconsciously lowering herself in the process. Emulation, on the other hand, is different; it's positive, constructive. By emulating the successful writer, the aspiring writer sets a goal for herself -- that is, to be the successful writer's equal, or to attain the level of the success the successful writer has achieved. In this regard, the aspiring writer gives herself a goal -- a purpose -- to want to become the best she can be as a writer.

Commitment, too, is a big part of the writing life, and writers become successful when they are committed to their craft. Commitment is regularly showing up to write; it's never missing a date with your notebook, typewriter or computer; it's sifting through feedback (or critiques) and making intelligent decisions regarding your work; it's developing the thick skin for rejections; it's keeping an open mind and reading not only what you like; and above all, it's keeping the passion for writing burning, and feeding it...even if it's only for as short as five minutes a day.

So...are you ready to become a successful writer?


Copyright (c) 2004 Shery Ma Belle Arrieta-Russ

Shery created WriteSparks! - a software that generates over 10 *million* Story Sparkers for Writers. Download WriteSparks! Lite for free - http://writesparks.com

Monday, April 25, 2016

WOI Guest Post: The Forces of Nature in Your Stories

Nature plays a big role in stories. Nature can make a character more authentic because it can influence his/her action or behavior.

If you ever find yourself stuck on to how to describe one of your characters, add a force of nature in your character description. Describe how your character behaves or reacts during a bad (or good) weather.

Take for example a few movies where forces of nature were vital. Imagine how the characters and the plots would change if the following forces of nature were taken away:

~ the tornado in the Wizard of Oz
~ the lightning in Phenomenon (John Travolta)
~ the volcanic eruption in Dante's Peak (Pierce Brosnan)
~ the icebergs in the Atlantic in Titanic (Leonardo diCaprio)
~ the avalanche in Vertical Limit (Chris O'Donnell)

Try to substitute another force of nature in the examples above and see how it affects the story and the characters.

Try it yourself on the following:

1. Deanna Ball possesses a strong sense of duty. She's stuck in a traffic jam. Force of nature: Earthquake

2. Randall Graves is people-oriented and works well with others. He's in a bar watching afternoon football with friends. Force of nature: Snowstorm

3. Dessa Woods has an intimidating personality. She's on vacation with a couple of friends. Force of nature: Avalanche

4. Geoff Earhart is organized and methodical in his approach to everything. He's been ordered to recover a vital piece of equipment from a capsized ship. Force of nature: Lightning storm

5. Mac Taylor is the persistent type. He's been trailing a woman who looked like his best friend's dead wife. Force of nature: Torrential rain



Copyright 2004 Shery Ma Belle Arrieta-Russ

Sunday, April 24, 2016

Writers- Directors - Producers - Movies - Books

Monday, April 25, 2016


Stephen Zimmer- Jennifer Malone Wright - Guests on WOI Network -








Join Marsha Casper Cook , A GOOD STORY IS A GOOD STORY on April 26 th at 11EST 10 CST 9 MT 8 PST when she welcomes Stephen Zimmer and Jennifer Malone Wright for a great discussion on Books to Movies.

The chat room will be open and the show is live! 714-242-5259

Stephen is an author, producer and director at EVER AFTER MEDIA and Jennifer is an author and marketing expert at STORYTIME BOOK REVIEWS AND PROMOTION.

Call in number is 714-242-5259

For more info please go tohttp://www.worldofinknetwork.com

http://www.stephenzimmer.com

/http://www.jenniferwrightauthor.com

http://www.marshacaspercook.com









LINK TO THE SHOW 


Thursday, March 31, 2016

Naughty Night Press -new Box set - Beyond The Veil







Naughty Nights Press Authors are the special guests on WOI Network.  Join Marsha Casper Cook on Tuesday April 5 at 9PM EST 8 PM CST 7 PM MT 6 PM PST when she welcomes Gina Kincade and several of her authors when they discuss their boxed set BEYOND THE VEIL.

19 FULL LENGTH NOVELS for 99 pennies! A STEAL of a DEAL! Shifters, Vampires, Witches, Wizards, & More! All manner of Magical & Mystical Paranormal Creatures!

20 USA Today, Amazon, International, and Award Winning Bestselling Authors in this LIMITED EDITION sizzling magical paranormal romance boxed set.

Beyond the Veil is 'Where Magic Happens,' and the alpha men and their sassy, head-strong and independent women, heat up the pages of this steamy and engaging collection of stories.



 Call in number (714) 242-5259


http://bit.ly/btvboxedset

#magical #paranormal #romance #boxedset #novels #fulllength #limitededition #beyondtheveil #vampires #witches #shifters #werewolves #gods #goddess #wizards #entertowin #giveaway


http://i874.photobucket.com/albums/ab307/Rebekah_Eastland_Ganiere/output_9LX60o%201_zpsnvi5ziq2.gif

 

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Randall Park -Writer - Producer Director - World Of Ink Special





Please join Marsha Casper Cook on April 1 at  1PM PST 2PM MT 3PM CST 4PMEST when her special guest will be Randall Dark, author,producer,director and cinematographer. He will be discussing his films and projects.



Feel free to call in because Randall welcomes callers. How great is that!

It's going to be a wonderful show so mark your calendar and if you're unable to listen live right after the show is over it's on demand.


Call in number 714-242-5259

Link to Randall
http://randalldarknews.blogspot.com/



For more info about advertising
http://www.worldofinknetwork.com
http://www.michiganavenuemedia.com













Salute to Women's History Month- World Of Ink Special





Please join Elizabeth Black and Marsha Casper Cook and their guests Nikki Guerlain and Lori Wolfe Safranek  for a World Of Ink Network Special Women's History Month show on Thursday March 31 at  4PMEST 3PM CST 2 PM MT 1 PM PST. It's going to be a great show and you won't want to miss it.

An afternoon of fun and discussion about Horror Writing in novels and scripts.The guests share their experiences in the field of Horror Writing. They met at the Stanley Hotel which is always a terrific topic to talk about. They will also be talking about scriptwriting horror films.

Feel free to join them in the chat room.


 Link to the live show and on demand.




For more info about the show go to

http://www.worldofinknetwork.com

http://www.michiganavenuemedia.com

marshacaspercook.com



Monday, March 28, 2016

Taking Baby Steps Every Week Can Yield a Book





The thought of writing a book is usually daunting for many writers. After all, how and where do you begin writing a book that's anywhere from 25,000 to 100,000 words?

Big numbers can be pretty intimidating. But there's a way to get around this. And it's by taking baby steps -- writing one chapter or even 300-500 words at a time.

This is how I wrote my book, WEEKLY WRITES: 52 Weeks of Writing Bliss! Every week for one whole year, I wrote one chapter or module. Each module was only 250 to 500 words. It helped too that as I wrote each module, writers were "testing" it. They did the activities in the module I sent out to them every week.

When I started, I began with an outline for Weekly Writes. This was just so I could see what I was supposed to do every week. An outline doesn't have to be set in stone. Think of an outline as a frame, a guide. It can be modified as you go along. So by the time I'd written chapter/module 52, I realized I had a book ready to show to a publisher or one that I could self-publish and sell the next day.

I didn't intend for Weekly Writes to be a book. I created it as an e-mail course. But when week #52 came around, I knew Weekly Writes could be a book too. I sent a proposal to a publisher and a week later received a note that she wished to review the manuscript. A couple of weeks later, I was offered a contract and given a deadline for submitting the final draft.

It took about 6 weeks to edit and rewrite some chapters. And to make the book even more useful to readers, I invited writers who had taken the e-mail course version to contribute creative pieces they've written as a direct result of doing the writing activities in the course modules.

The result? A *writer-tested* book.

On top of that, I had fun writing it because when I wrote a chapter, I simply wrote. I stuck to writing 250-500 words once a week. One baby step at a time. It was certainly easier to write when I worked with smaller goals (word quota every week).

Perhaps you can try it too. You may have a book 52 weeks from now, even sooner!


Copyright 2004 Shery Ma Belle Arrieta-Russ

Shery is the creator of WriteSparks! - a software that generates over 10 *million* Story Sparkers for Writers. Download WriteSparks! Lite for fr*e - http://writesparks.com